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History

Nevada is as rich in history as it is top-quality entertainment and travel destinations. Join us as we celebrate our wonderful state’s colorful past.


Experience  “The 36th Star”

September/October 2014
As Nevada celebrates its sesquicentennial, the Nevada Museum of Art in Reno is giving visitors the chance to explore the state’s heritage through its exhibition, “The 36th Star: Nevada’s Journey from Territory to State.” Three years in the making, this one-of-a-kind exhibition brings together—for the first time—key documents and artifacts to help place Nevada’s legacy into the broader context of the Civil War and American history. The centerpiece is a four-day presentation of the Emancipation Proclamation signed by President Abraham Lincoln.

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Bowers Mansion

July/August 2014
The best view of Nevada’s gold- and silver-mining days can still be seen from the Bowers Mansion porch. On a warm summer afternoon, you can sit back and enjoy the same view once seen through the eyes of early Nevadans. If you use your imagination, you can picture guests arriving for a picnic: the women in their Victorian dresses; and picnic hats covered with white Swiss and green ribbons. They arrive from every direction by horse and buggy, and train.

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Battle Born Birthday Cakes

SewellsBakery-teaserMarch/April 2014
The Nevada Centennial Commission Final Report of 1964 declares, “It’s unlikely that anyone will soon attempt to repeat the feat of making so gigantic a cake.” On March 21, 2014, a similar party will occur in Carson City at Carson-Tahoe Hospital’s Sage Café. The Nevada 150 signature event is free and open to the public.

 

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The Metropolis That Wasn’t

Metropolis-Nevada-teaserJanuary/February 2014
Many of Nevada’s ghost towns boomed, prospered, and faded in the 1800s, when the state was largely undeveloped and had no major population centers. It’s hard to believe that a city that existed in the 1940s—an era of jet engines and color television—has all but vanished.

 

 

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