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Belvada Hotel: Building History One Room at a Time

Way back in days of yore there was this legendary building in a historic mining town that begged to be visited. It stood sentinel, high in the desert hills, doors shuttered for decades, with its secrets locked forever inside. It once housed the riches of miners, the homes of families, and eventually, their faded memories. I can barely recall when I first learned of this forgotten treasure…it’s been so many years now. I believe it was 2018, if memory serves.
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Nevada Outdoorsmen in Wheelchairs

Hunting can be difficult; then factor in logistics, travel, practice, preparation, cost of gear, scouting, and buck fever. Not to mention animals are incredibly well adapted to the environment and have been outsmarting predators for all of history. All of this compounded can be intimidating to hunters, but especially those with disabilities who rely upon a wheelchair for mobility. The prospect doesn’t have to be intimidating, however, thanks to a group of Nevada volunteers who make it their mission to bring accessible hunting to people in wheelchairs. Each year, Nevada Outdoorsmen in Wheelchairs (NOW) brings an all-inclusive hunting experience to a handful of lucky applicants. The group provides the hunt of a lifetime in Nevada, and couples the experience with adventure, education, and a whole lot of surprises.
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Tahoe Rim Trail

With a gaping hunger hole in my stomach and waning morale, I stare at the absolute chaotic mess on the ground. My wife Jillian and I are 17 miles into the wild and remote Desolation Wilderness, and the destroyed plastic remnants of our nutrition for the next three days stare back at us—an amalgamation of torn Ziploc bags, crushed dehydrated beans, tiny globules of peanut butter and Spam. It is clear that our food storage method has failed, and the cunning persistence of the American black bear has won yet again.
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Freedom Fishing

Picture fly fishing a pristine mountain stream; a poetic scene. The sun is smiling down warmly, the birds are calmly singing, and soothing sounds of nature fill the angler with peace. Each cast is artistic, and nearly every flick of the line leads to a plump trout on the other end. Everything is perfect, and the angler smiles as they have not a care in the world. That is not what fly fishing is like at all.
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Nevada’s Basque History

Looking from the outside in, sheepherding and Basques in Nevada go hand-in-hand. But for the Basque immigrant life wasn’t that simple. First, he had to overcome a language barrier, as well as homesickness. He then had to learn a completely foreign skill—herding sheep—under strenuous circumstances.
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On the Sails of a Prairie Schooner

For the pioneer of the mid-1800s leaving life behind to verify whispers of gold out west, the scene must've been something spectacular. In many cases, the ordinary family farm wagon was modified for the trip: hickory bows were affixed to the wagon bed and a canvas cloth was stretched over the top. The wagons in those days became known as prairie schooners, due to the cover’s resemblance to a boat’s sail.
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Lee Canyon

Las Vegas is known for its toasty temperatures, celebrity-studded swimming pools, and steamy nightlife. It’s often called an adult Disneyland where adventure and fantasy can be found around seemingly every corner, and activities of every stripe can be found. There is one thing, however, that many visitors don’t know about Las Vegas: it’s a great place to go skiing and snowboarding.  You read that correctly, and while no one is comparing the Spring Mountains to the Alps, with just a modicum of effort, a winter adventure awaits above the desert of southern Nevada. 
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Haunted Nevada

Something Spectral Part 1: Carson City offers a host of spooky sites. BY MEGG MUELLER & ERIC CACHINERO With an arsenal of abandoned historical buildings and eerie locations, Nevada can occasionally be spooky. Much of the energy stems from the state’s mining history, which got grizzly and dark at times. Mine fires and construction catastrophes […]
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Finding Feathers

Each seasoned bird hunter knows the feeling. The perfect conditions lead to the perfect day hunting. A warm sun complements solitude offered atop the mountain peaks, hunting dogs bound and leap with electrified energy searching for birds, and a light layer of snow on the ground reveals hundreds of tiny chukar footprints. Suddenly, the hunter hears the intoxicating and familiar chirping of dozens of chukar high on the mountain above him. Chuck chuck chuck chuck chuck chuck chuck chuck chuck chuck chuck chuck.
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True Grit: Wells

Mother Nature has tried to have her way with the northeastern town of Wells. Fires and a powerful earthquake have done their best to level the micropolitan burg about 50 miles east of Elko, without success. So too did the winds of change, when the town was all but bypassed by progress, but in the face of it all, Wells has persevered and maintained its charm while keeping a weather eye on the future.
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True Grit: Caliente

Railroad town is riding a new wave of economic prosperity. BY MEGG MUELLER A person with true grit is often defined as someone who sticks to their goals, despite problems, setbacks, and failures. Having true grit means you are tough and determined…you have a steadfast core. In 2019, we are highlighting towns in Nevada that […]
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True Grit: Hawthorne

The Silver State has seen many towns come and go; ghost towns litter the state and have been said to outnumber live towns 6 to 1. While many living towns have seen their fortunes rise and fall, and their populations swell and dwindle, very few have felt it the way Hawthorne has.
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Reno Rodeo Turns 100

A century of the Wildest, Richest Rodeo in the West. BY GUY CLIFTON In spring 1919, the Commercial Club of Reno—a precursor to the Reno Chamber of Commerce—created a committee known as the Reno Rodeo Association. The committee was filled with many of the city’s leading citizens, including cattle baron William H. Moffat, auto dealer […]
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True Grit: Lovelock

From 1841-1869, the lure of gold and silver, gentler weather, and the chance for a new life encouraged some 250,000 people to leave the comforts of their eastern homes and set out West. Many emigrants chose to follow the California Trail, and many died when they tried to cross the 40-Mile Desert, which ran roughly between Lovelock and Fernley.
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Stamps Mark the Spot

There is a lot to see in Nevada—110,557 square miles of rugged, picturesque mountains, lakes, and desert. Because of the state’s large size and wide-open spaces, it can be daunting for even the most courageous traveler to figure out how to see it all, or even where to start. That is where commemorative passports come into play.
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True Grit: Beatty

The cycle of life in many Nevada towns can be measured by the presence of mining activity. Ore found? Boom! Ore depleted? Bust! The town of Beatty has ridden the mining roller coaster for most of its existence, and it would be an oversimplification to say the lack of mining business has routinely dampened the town’s economy. From its very beginnings, however, Beatty has continued to go with the flow.