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Lip Smacking Foodie Tour

Savvy travelers know that the best way to become truly acquainted with a place is through its cuisine—but which restaurants do you choose? How can you get a comprehensive sampling without a big price tag or exhausting trial and error? In southern Nevada, the answer is simple, thanks to Lip Smacking Foodie Tours.  
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Spirited Adventures

Nevada’s distinct history is borne by the nearly 600 towns that rose and fell before the 1900s even had a chance to stretch its legs. The gold and silver fever that struck the nation resulted in a clamor that touched nearly every corner of the state. While most towns bore fruit only for short periods, they literally left their mark on the state’s landscape. Many ghost towns have no more residents, but they are still full of stories, if you listen carefully.  
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Legendary Nevadans: Mark Twain

All Nevada is a stage, and cowpokes, artists, activists, and visionaries are the players in a drama centuries in the making. Whether born or raised, these special characters aren’t just Nevadans: they’re Legendary Nevadans.  In 1861, Samuel Clemens was living his childhood dream as a steamboat pilot on the Mississippi. The 25-year-old had established himself as a talented, respected navigator and earned a considerable salary of $70 a week (equivalent to about $2,000 today).   But that summer, Clemens knew his days as a pilot were over. The Civil War had just begun, and military blockades were undoing his livelihood. With few prospects in his home state of Missouri, a new opportunity suddenly appeared from his older brother.  
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Wildlife Photography

Some of America’s favorite wild creatures thrive in Nevada’s 3-million-plus acres of wilderness. Keep an eye out for animals you know—after all, more than half the nation’s wild horses roam free here—but also species you might not expect like the surface-dwelling desert fish (the world’s rarest). Bring your camera; chances for photography and incredible encounters await.
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Ely’s Renaissance Village

Tucked into the hills in northeast Nevada, Ely was a thriving, multi-ethnic community for most of the 20th century. After the town entered a recession in the 1990s, a group of citizens embarked on a mission to transform one ruined block of homes into a place of living history.
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Step Into Reno’s Past

So you’re in Reno and want to get acquainted with the city: where should you start? Consider this walking tour a primer for exploring the city. Beginning next to the neon and nightlife of downtown, you’ll end your walk on a bohemian street where locals shop and dine. Along the way, discover a post office-turned-indie mall, a riverside restaurant on Reno’s most historic site, and one of the town’s earliest buildings. We begin just south of the Truckee River right after crossing the bridge on Virginia Street. 
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Nevada’s State Parks

One of the lures of Nevada’s wide-open spaces is the ability to find a bit of solitude in a busy world. Sometimes finding that outdoor quiet requires long treks and dirt roads—not that there’s anything wrong with that! But sometimes, that quiet escape can be found just off the highway. No matter your choice, if you’re looking to go where the crowds aren’t, look no further than these naturally socially-distanced state parks.
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What’s In A Name?

Just like superheroes, every town’s name has an origin story. Some are straightforward: Mesquite is named for a tree found in the region; Carson City is named after the pioneer Kit Carson. For others, the tale has a little more to it: Yerington, for example, was originally called Greenfield, but had to be renamed when the postal service said there were already too many towns called that. Here's a look at other towns where the story is disputed, steeped in legend, or just downright fun.  
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Rock Out

Getting down—and maybe dirty—in the hills of Nevada is one of the easiest, least expensive, and most rewarding pastimes you’ll ever find. Hunting for gems and minerals can be an easy day trip from many towns, including Fallon, Ely, and Mesquite. 
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Nevada’s State Parks

Nevada’s parks celebrate the Great Basin's natural and human history, and for this issue, we’re zeroing in on ones that tell the story of the state from prehistory to today. Get ready for a trek through time; along the way you’ll meet ancient reptiles, tour military forts, and hang out in pioneer pit stops.
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Spirited Adventures

Nevada’s distinct history is borne by the nearly 600 towns that rose and fell before the 1900s even had time to stretch its legs. The gold and silver fever that struck the nation resulted in a clamor that touched nearly every corner of the state. While most towns bore fruit only for short periods, they literally left their mark on the state’s landscape. Many ghost towns may have no residents, but they are still full of stories, if you listen closely.  
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Break Time!

Spring break. The phrase conjures many thoughts, but for parents it’s one simple question— where should we take the kids? The weather can be mercurial, much like the kids’ moods, but staying home is just not an option. Across the Silver State, spring break can be celebrated indoors and out, with adventures both near and far. Here are just a few. 
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Where The Wild Things Are

While the bald eagle serves as a national emblem for the U.S., the states tend to take icons to a new level. Sure, there’s a state animal in Nevada, but there’s also a reptile, fish, and even a state insect. Without further ado, here are five creatures that Nevadans chose to embody the spirit of the state.  
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Legendary Nevadans: Wyatt and Virgil Earp

On a cold October day in 1881, four men approached a group of cowboys gathered in an alley. These four represented the law in Tombstone, Arizona: City Marshal Virgil Earp, his brothers Wyatt and Morgan, and Doc Holliday. Reports of what happened next run the gamut from massacre to a fair fight, but 30 seconds later, three cowboys were dead and the West’s most famous shootout at the O.K. Corral entered the history books—guaranteeing posterity would know the names Virgil and Wyatt Earp.
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Discovering Nevada Through its Desert Caves

In 1885, Absalom Lehman was riding south of his remote ranch near the Nevada-Utah border. As he worked his way into the verdant mountains near his homestead, the ground suddenly gave way and the horse and rider plunged through a chasm in the earth. Recovering from the fall, Lehman rose and beheld a vast cavern of geological wonder.
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Pyramid Lake Love Letter

Until 2020, I don’t think there was ever a year that I didn't go to Pyramid Lake. That means, for 54 years, no matter where I lived, I made sure to get to my favorite lake at least once a year. My parents started taking me to Pyramid when I was just a baby, and today, I take my grandchildren there. I think I have the lake’s dirt in my blood, and I know I have it in my soul.