History

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Las Vegas’ Westside Story

For five months in 1955, Las Vegas’ Westside District was an unlikely center of African American entertainment, culture, and optimism. The source was the city’s new Moulin Rouge Hotel, which opened at a time when racism was rampant across the nation.   
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Robbery at Rawhide

One of the West's last stagecoach robberies reads like a good heist novel: the criminal duo, the masked hold up, a posse, good old-fashioned police work, and swift justice. However, this 1907 robbery ends on a mysterious note.
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Step Into Reno’s Past

So you’re in Reno and want to get acquainted with the city: where should you start? Consider this walking tour a primer for exploring the city. Beginning next to the neon and nightlife of downtown, you’ll end your walk on a bohemian street where locals shop and dine. Along the way, discover a post office-turned-indie mall, a riverside restaurant on Reno’s most historic site, and one of the town’s earliest buildings. We begin just south of the Truckee River right after crossing the bridge on Virginia Street. 
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The Disaster at Mazuma

When a sudden cloudburst bursts over the small towns of Seven Troughs and Mazuma, residents had only seconds to evacuate out of the raging torrent. After the flood waters rushed through the canyon, a town was completely destroyed.
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A Paradise Named Galena

For outdoor recreation, Galena Creek Regional Park outside Reno is a splendid, outdoor playground that’s hard to beat during any season—but especially autumn. Moreover, Galena has a historical Nevada notch that's not so well-known.
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A Preppie in Pioche

After hitchhiking cross-country from my family's home in New Rochelle, New York, I landed in Salt Lake City looking for a job—any job a husky kid could get. The "men wanted" newspaper ads called for muckers in a Nevada mine. I walked to the hiring office of Combined Metals near my hotel. It was the first of May 1946. I was still a teenager, not long out of Kiski Prep near Pittsburgh.
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Ruby Lake National Wildlife Refuge

East of the crest of Nevada’s Ruby Mountains lies the immense Ruby Valley, a pastoral expanse of quiet and prosperous ranch land. The dirt Ruby Valley Road follows the western edge of this high desert valley for 35 miles, before finally arriving at an oasis: A huge wetland of marshes, shallow lakes, and drainage ponds that encompasses the Ruby Lake National Wildlife Refuge, the most remote wildlife refuge in the continental U.S.   
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Nevada’s Basque History

Looking from the outside in, sheepherding and Basques in Nevada go hand-in-hand. But for the Basque immigrant life wasn’t that simple. First, he had to overcome a language barrier, as well as homesickness. He then had to learn a completely foreign skill—herding sheep—under strenuous circumstances.
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Helen Stewart: First Lady of Las Vegas

On a quiet day in March 1926, businesses in Las Vegas shuttered their doors. Local schools closed for the day and the federal post office was deserted, for most of the city’s residents were attending the funeral of Helen Jane Wiser Stewart. The homage paid to Stewart by the city she helped create would have surprised the unassuming and frail woman. But the legacy of her strength, character, intelligence, and spirit was evident to all who knew her, and it continues to inspire today.
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Yesterday: Driving Into History

In 1909 pioneer motorist Alice Ramsey took an automobile, and women drivers, a long way. BY PHILLIP I. EARL This story first appeared in the April 1992 issue of Nevada Magazine.    Three quarters of a century ago, women drivers were viewed not only as a danger to themselves and others but also as a […]
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Iconic Las Vegas Sign Turns 60  

Imagine driving into Las Vegas, and being greeted by a sign that reads “Welcome to Las Vegas The Gateway to Boulder Dam.” If your drive took place before 1959, that’s what you would have seen at the intersection of Fremont and Main Streets. It wasn’t until the 1950s when the golden age of neon signage—and today’s iconic sign—began on the Las Vegas Strip
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The Man Howard Hughes Left Behind

Melvin Dummar recounts his brush with fortune and loss.   BY SHAUN ASTOR “I grew up in Fallon. There was an airport, where the Churchill County rodeo grounds are at,” Melvin Dummar, now 74 years old, recalls on a warm evening as the sun falls behind the Resting Spring Mountain Range to the west of […]
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Hard Pressed to Survive

In a world of PayPal, Bitcoin, and all manner of electronic currency where paper money looks downright antiquated, coins are relegated to almost nuisance status. Heavy and destined for the ashtray or swear jar, coin as currency is a near relic. But since 1792, the U.S. has been minting coins for trade and commerce, and in all that time just eight towns were honored with the presence of a mint. Carson City is one of those towns, and the history of the Silver State's only mint is one that could make you rethink that change rattling around in your pocket.